Freedom— or Burden of Choice? – Part 2

Here we are, living at the pinnacle of human possibility, awash in
material abundance. As a society, we have achieved what our ancestors could, at
most, only dream about, but it has come at a great price. We get what we say we
want, only to discover that what we want doesn’t satisfy us…
” — Barry
Schwartz, The Paradox of Choice, 2004

We have more material possessions and time-saving devices, but we still don’t
have enough time. The middle classes of many countries, not just America, have a
degree of autonomy and personal control unimaginable to people living in other
times and places.

In America, the gross domestic product, a primary measure of prosperity, more
than doubled in the last 30 years. But the proportion of the population
describing itself as “very happy” declined 5 percent. That doesn’t sound like
much, but 5 percent represents 14 million people who reported that in the 70s
they were very happy but who say that today they are not.

What to Do About Choice Overload?

Barry Schwartz, in his book The Paradox of Choice (2004), offers good advice for
getting a handle on the problems of too many choices, but they are not easy
steps. They require practice, discipline, and a change in the way we think about
the value of choice. One of the best ways to explore the problems of choice and
solutions is to work with a coach who can help you look at your assumptions and
beliefs about freedom and what really matters most.

As Barry Schwartz concludes in his book,

Remember that ‘He who dies with the most toys wins’ is a bumper sticker, not
wisdom.

This is a brief synopsis of an article available for your newsletters or ezines, in
either text, PDF or HTML custom designs. The full article contains the following
concepts:

Modern Times and Rising Suicide Rates
What to Do About Choice Overload?
Choose What to Choose
What Really Matters?
An Attitude of Gratitude
Resources

Here is the order link for purchasing the article in text version:

S04-21a. Text Version 1,000 word article, Full Reprint Rights $57 click HERE

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