A professional Business Man in a Grey Pin Stripe Suit, wears a g“Toxic leaders cast their spell broadly. Most of us claim we abhor them. Yet we frequently follow — or at least tolerate — them.” ~ Jean Lipman-Blumen, The Allure of Toxic Leaders (Oxford University Press, 2004)

Much has been written about toxic leaders with psychopathic traits and narcissistic personality disorders. Bad leaders leave a trail of diminishing returns, ruined reputations, failed products, employee litigation and disheartened staffs.

But applying labels doesn’t solve any problems. Leadership is relationship-driven, and organizational toxicity involves all levels—from followers to executive boards. Chopping off the rotting head won’t do the trick when the entire organizational system has been infected.

Companies that replace one dysfunctional leader with another often run through a series of CEOs in an attempt to find the right savior. They’re effectively changing seats on the Titanic. Consultants and coaches may try to treat toxicity’s symptoms, but they’ll achieve lasting results only when they address its root causes.

Despite our best efforts at developing leadership skills, we continue to witness counterproductive and destructive workplace behaviors. Toxic leadership is a major contributor to employee disengagement. Left unchecked, bad behavior invites turnover, absenteeism, grievances, bad press and costly lawsuits.

Can leadership coaches and consultants diagnose and “cure” these destructive leaders? It’s not easy. Most toxic leadership behaviors are embedded in dysfunctional systems that actually promote destructiveness through poor policies, avoidance and negligence. But many case studies prove that change is possible; It requires a major shift in assumptions and engagement in coaching/training.

This article examines toxic leadership and takes a new look at solutions, and suggests innovative transformation strategies and steps to prevent or correct organization toxicity levels.

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This is a brief synopsis of a 1,500-word and a 900-word article and 5 Article Nuggets*, suitable for consultants’ newsletters for executives and leaders in organizations. It is available for purchase with full reprint rights, which means you may put your name on it and use it in your newsletters, blogs or other marketing materials. You may also modify it and add your personal experiences and perspectives.

The complete article includes these important concepts:

  • Signs of Toxicity
  • Resisting External Help
  • Transformational Opportunities
  • Toxicity Prevention Plan
  • Readiness for Change
  • Toxicity Correction Plan

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ID-10088165When’s the best time to implement change?

Before you need to do so.

In a world of accelerating product and technology developments, the way you handle your job today is far different from when you first started out. Business in the 21st century is continuously reinvented and innovated. If you resist change, thriving and surviving may prove elusive.

Companies that focus on innovation not only keep pace, but drive change. Think beyond adaptation; look toward making significant contributions that shape the future.

If you and your organization fail to innovate, you’re on the path to stagnation and obsolescence. Today’s competitive advantages will not be tomorrow’s.

Can you identify fresh trends and walk away from outdated core competencies, when necessary? Are you actively preparing new products and services?

Organizations adapt only if their people do. This means that everyone — leaders, managers and staff — must acquire an innovation mindset to improve today’s job performance and prepare for future demands.

Whenever start-ups clobber big companies, the writing was almost always on the wall. Everything looked fine — until the day it didn’t. Will your business be ready before that day comes?

This article examines the paradox of innovation, explores the four phase process, and suggests ways to acquire innovative qualities. 

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This is a brief synopsis of a 1,630-word and an 900-word article and Article Nuggets,*suitable for consultants’ newsletters for executives and leaders in organizations. It is available for purchase with full reprint rights, which means you may put your name on it and use it in your newsletters, blogs or other marketing materials. You may also modify it and add your personal experiences and perspectives.

The complete article includes these important concepts:

  • Innovation Is a Discipline
  • Enemies of Innovation
  • The Four Phases of Innovation:
    1. Innovation Starts with the Customer
    2. From Idea to Plan
    3. Assessing and Testing Ideas
    4. Putting Plans to Work
  • Acquiring Innovative Qualities

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All others please use the order links below.

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1.  The Innovator’s Paradox 1,630-word Article with Full Reprint Rights, $79

 

2.  The Innovator’s Paradox -900-word article with Full Reprint Rights, $57

 

 

3.  The Innovator’s Paradox - 5-Article Nuggets* with Full Reprint Rights,  $89

 

 

*Article Nuggets: The same article broken up into 3-5 blog-style sections suitable for a series of blog posts or shorter newsletter articles.

 

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